Art & Design
Ruby Pilven Ceramics

Ceramic artistry as colourful as its ceramicist

Ruby’s work is loud, colourful, contemporary and – in every sense – one-of-a-kind. It’s no wonder her Instagram account has more than 26,000 followers.


It’s a drizzly winter’s day. The roads are glistening in the rain’s afterglow, and the dense eucalyptus trees make me feel right at home. (The fact that I grew up about 300 meters down the road probably helps in this respect.)

I pull into Ruby Pilven’s driveway and I’m surrounded by the calm of the native surrounds. As I close the car door behind me, Ruby steps outside her charming mud brick home, coffee in-hand and a look of subtle apprehension on her face. “I just woke up,” she admits. She doesn’t look it though. She’s perfectly put together, her short brunette hair swept to one side and her make-up impeccable.


Born in Ballarat, the 26-year-old grew up in Smythes Creek, about 20 minutes out of the city centre. “It’s really beautiful out here,” she says. “We’ve got a dam, 10 acres, and my parents built the house and the studio.”

Both Ruby’s parents are potters, meaning she was immersed in creativity’s embrace from the minute she was born. “Living with both artists and potters, I guess my life as a child was very creative all the time,” she says.

Following in her parents’ footsteps, Ruby has made a name for herself as a renowned ceramic artist. She owes her success to her Mum and Dad’s constant nurturing abilities, and also the fact that she’s “a little bit quirky”. “They called me the elegant bogan at university,” she exclaims. It’s hard to understand why. There’s nothing remotely bogan about her. She’s articulate and carries herself with poise. Plus, she’s wearing Gorman.


“I learned ceramics from both my parents and it started when I was really little. I used to play around while Mum and Dad were working in the studio and I’d go to the markets and help Mum sell her pots. Then I started selling these incense holders that I used to make. I learned how to talk to people in the market, set up stands and do all that from watching Mum and Dad.”

“My parents always tried to push me away from art, because they were like ‘no, stay away! You’ll make no money!’” Ruby laughs. “I always thought I was going to do law or German at university, but there was always this burning desire to study art.”


After completing high school, Ruby went on to study a double degree in Business and Visual Art (printmaking) at Monash University. Although her background is in printmaking, her upbringing allowed her to forge a career in ceramics relatively easily while using her other skills to bring some truly unique elements to her craft.

“Every piece that I make is different, but I guess one of my most recognisable ranges is my hand-built colourful range which plays on the contemporary Japanese technique of Nerikomi and inlay. So I use a variety of techniques, and marbling as well. I’ve just sort of created my own aesthetic by applying three or four different techniques together.”

“I just started off on Instagram, and I posted things that I liked,” she says. “I thought, well if anyone else likes it, then that’s a bonus – which isn’t really a marketing thing.


You’re looking out at a dam, seeing the birds and the trees, and that’s inspired the imagery you see in my work.
Ruby Pilven, Ruby Pilven Ceramics

A few years ago, Ruby was asked to feature a collection at the National Gallery of Victoria in conjunction with the Hermitage Exhibition. It was at this point that people really started taking notice of her talent. “Then I thought, oh actually, maybe this is a thing. Maybe I could do this more.

“I finally had a moment where I could just do studio work, which I’ve always loved doing. There was no desk job and there was no studying. I could just do it. I think Mum and Dad thought I was insane.”

As well as featuring a collection at the NGV, she’s sold her work to Australian designer Gorman and international retail giant Anthropologie, which has stockists throughout Australia and overseas, and has been featured across a variety of media publications across the country including The Design Files, allowing her to significantly solidify her online presence and her name in the national creative space.


Growing up in a regional city, Ruby says she has really been able to harness her artistry, absorb her surroundings and focus entirely on her craft.

“It’s so good for when you’re making work. Instead of looking out on a busy road, you’re looking out at a dam, seeing the birds and the trees, and that’s also inspired on the imagery you see in my work.

“I love living in Ballarat because it’s a simple lifestyle. You can get somewhere in five minutes and get a park out the front; you can go into the coffee shop and they know your name and you know the lady because you teach her daughter at school. Everyone’s connected. There’s a real community feel.

“The arts and culture space is really thriving too. There’s so much support for it, there’s people noticing it, and there’s a lot going on. I even have friends in Melbourne who would never step out of the city coming to visit.”

To find out more about Ruby and her ceramics, click here.


Stay & Play

OLAF / KERSTENS EXHIBITION


Admire exclusive photographic works from two of today’s most significant practicing Dutch photographers – Erwin Olaf and Hendrik Kerstens. Exhibited in the majestic Craig’s Royal Hotel, this regional-first is hosted in collaboration with the Ballarat International Foto Biennale.

LEARN MORE

Earle Ballarat
Lascelles Terraces


Stay in a space of pure luxury laden with historic elegance at the lovingly restored Earle Ballarat – Lascelles Terraces. Boasting original 19th century features with a contemporary overlay, these Victorian townhouses provide a home base rich in history.

LEARN MORE

THE LOST ONES GALLERY AND BAR


Enter the ominous walls of a 19th century Masonic Lodge and wander through Ballarat’s contemporary art space The Lost Ones. Venture further below to the speakeasy-like basement bar and delight in tapas, wine and spirits as you while the evening away to a tune or two.

LEARN MORE